From the March 2007 Idaho Observer:


Donít tag Texas! Stop the NAU!

Donít mess with Texas "free"ways!


By The Idaho Observer

On a beautiful March 2, over 2,000 Texans converged on the state capitol in Austin to protest the national animal ID system, the creation of the North American Union (NAU) and the stateís selling off of vital publicly-funded infrastructure to foreign interests to finance construction of the Trans-Texas Corridor (TTC)óthe Texas leg of the NAFTA superhighway.

The well-organized, three-hour rally received favorable local newspaper and TV coverage. Corridor Watch founder David Stall was even interviewed by CNNís Lou Dobbs, the only major media voice outspokenly opposed to the NAFTA, the NAU and the New World Order.

The event is significant because ranchers, farmers, working people, city dwellers, professionals and politicians came out in public opposition to the policies of the Bush administration and Texas Governor Rick Perry, both of which are working underhandedly to destroy the sovereignty of the U.S. It is also significant because the event generated favorable local and national media coverage.

The rally kicked off with Representative Garnet Coleman speaking about HB 998, his toll moratorium bill and the genesis of it that started last session in 2005. He thanked the grassroots for their efforts which give his bill a better chance of passing due to the massive growth of public awareness and interest since 2005.

Then Rep. Lois Kolkhorst shared her bill HB 1881 with the crowd which will KILL the Trans Texas Corridor (TTC). She shared a bit of Texas history and thanked the people for the strength of their support which will help her bills get passed and free Texans from this boondoggle. She said this is about the next generation as she pointed to her daughter playing behind her on the Capitol steps. "Sheís absolutely right. My six children were with me at the Capitol as well; itís a sobering thought to think theyíll still be paying tolls to a foreign company if this thing gets built and these contracts get signed all over Texas. Itís what keeps me in this fight!" commented a woman named Teri who reported the event.

Penny Langford-Freeman from Congressman Ron Paulís office inspired everyone to stay in this fight to keep Texas FREE and independent, referring to the NAFTA connection and the formation of the North American Union, stating Congressman Paul is squarely and firmly on our side fighting for us in Washington, which got the crowd chanting, "Ron Paul for President!. (Rep. Paul has officially declared his candidacy for president in the 2008 elections).

Teri commented that "Rep. Nathan Macias, who took the place of "Toller" Carter Casteel who REFUSED to listen to her constituents on tolls, sits on Rep. Mike Kruseeís House Transportation Committee where Krusee is bottling up ANY bills that would help our cause. Thatís why Kolkhorst and others are bypassing Kruseeís Committee and getting our legislation through other committees. Nonetheless, we have many allies on the House Transportation Committee, Macias (a native San Antonian) being the champion of our cause for the San Antonio region!"

Austinís legendary blues artist Jimmie Vaughan played "Shackles," a song he wrote after reading the book "Spy Chips." In his Texas blues style, it lyrically protests the RFID chip, the surveillance state and government as "Big Brother."

Other speakers stirred up the crowd and led them in a variety of chants like "No TTC," "Impeach Perry," and "Donít Tag Texas." Among the sea of protest signs were, "Stop the TTC," "Donít Mess With Texas Freeways," "Perry is selling us out."

The winds of change are definitely blowing in Texas.



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